Pylon of the Month

Pylon of the Month - June 2017

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The month of May passed by without a pylon and so summer is now here rather than 'icumen in'.  This month's pylon, however, is looking back to a day in the Alps earlier in the year when a fan of the website took time out to take this picture of a mountain pylon.  The angle of the transmission lines leaving the pylon is pretty impressive, but sadly for pylon fans everywhere I couldn't find any technical details of maximum permissible angles or the engineering challenges of building pylons in mountainous areas.

 The email by which the picture arrived was pithy and to the point:

At Plan des Queux near Pointe de Daillant in French Alps. Height: 2150m. 

It also showed evidence that this pylon fan had been willing to go the extra mile (metaphorically if not literally):

Accessed on foot.

I couldn't track down the exact location on a map, but a quick look into electricity in the French Alps led to a story that I found impossible to ignore.  

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So if you're a pylon fan and a cheese connoisseur on a skiing holiday next year then surely you won't be able to resist popping to Albertville.  If you do and there pylons on view please do send me a picture!

 

 


Pylon of The Month - April 2017

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I get quite a lot of emails from fans of the website with pictures of pylons attached, but the one that led to April's Pylon of the Month started very well:
 
Thank you for maintaining that wonderful publication that is Pylon of the Month.
 
 Needless to say, I warmed to the sender immediately and the email continued:
 
Your blog's fame has travelled wide, as have the subjects of the blog. However the under-representation of New Zealand's pylons has not gone unnoticed, and we do have some stunning examples that service the predominantly hydro-generated supply across some spectacular landscapes.   Of course, we must redress this, but I will start slowly, with the attached modern pylons, with their slender elegance and a dodecahedral cross-section. These recently replaced the old lattice style pylons to allow for the upgrade of Christchurch's western ring-road.
 
I'm very happy to be redressing the balance by featuring these New Zealand pylons and I have to agree that the modern pylons are rather splendid.  They are on the corner of Russley and Ryan's Road if you are in Christchurch and want to pop over and see them in real life.  I particularly like the combination in one picture of the old lattice pylons (in the distance) and the new pylons.  Regular readers will know that the new T-pylon in the UK is on its way and as far as I'm aware the first time that both designs will be used in the same place is for the connection to Hinckley Point C.  The new T-pylons are shorter and so apparently less intrusive in their visual impact on the landscape.  Anyway, back to New Zealand where, according to Wikipedia, over 50% of the country's power comes from hydroelectric.  For those readers keen to know more about electricity in New Zealand, there is 'Electricity in New Zealand' which according to the website 'tells the story of the electricity industry in a simple and engaging way' and having looked through it, I'd wholeheartedly agree.  
 
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That's all for this month but come back in May for more pylon action or follow @pylonofthemonth on Twitter for even more regular pylon action.
 
 
 
 

Pylon of the Month - February 2017

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Happy New Year (somewhat belatedly) to pylon fans everywhere!  

Despite the relatively mild and wet weather as I write this month's post, February seemed the right month for this fantastic picture to feature as Pylon of the Month.  It was taken in West Yorkshire just outside Ripponden by Adrian Jackson.  As he pointed out in the email he sent in with the picture:

The photo has only been treated to change exposure and colour balance, no pylons have been added. There are actually two lines of pylons which both turn through ninety degrees.

Now for some serious pylon geekery.  Talk of turning through ninety degrees above prompts me to talk about the difference between pylons where the transmission line is running in a straight line as opposed to when there is a change in direction.  In a straight line run, the line is suspended from the pylon by vertical insulators (see the second and third pylons going down the hill above).  However, when there is a change of direction (like in the pylon in the foreground above) the insulators are horizontal and the pylon is known as a tension pylon.  More from the National Grid on a page talking about the new T-pylons:

In a perfect world electricity transmission lines would run as straight as possible, but natural barriers, such as hills, rivers and roads, have to be circumvented or crossed and land rights issues can often require a route to turn a corner.  This places a lot of lateral strain on a pylon, to the side where the line turns, and so the suspension design needs to be supplemented so pylons can resist being pulled to one side.............. the extra strength required will mean that the wires will not be able to be suspended vertically from insulators, but will instead need to be held in place more securely by horizontal insulators tied to the pylon itself – hence the term, tension pylon.

You might also notice above that there are loops of wire dangling from the tension pylon that you don't see on pylons where the line is running straight.  These loops are known as 'jumper loops' and again from National Grid:

Due to the lines being tied to the structure itself by insulators, we have to provide a path for the electricity to continue to flow. So, we use ‘jumper loops’, which are short sections of electrical wire connected to the main (live and earth) wires just before they tie to the insulators, terminating the line to the cross arm. The jumper loops are designed to ensure the live wire does not touch the earthed structure.

What a great way to start 2017. A fabulous pylon picture in a Yorkshire landscape and technical pylon talk.  To make February even better, make sure that you get along to the Wellcome institute for their "Electricity: The Spark of Life" exhibition which opens on 23rd February and runs until 25th June.  If you team that up with watching 'Amongst Giants' a film about Yorkshire pylon painters starring Pete Postlethwaite then you'll really have ticked all the boxes.

 


Pylon of the Month - September 2016

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With a new school year starting, getting a pylon up on the blog for September is always tough and with the middle of the month looming, I'd begun to think that it might not happen.  Yesterday, however, I had a conversation with one of the students I teach and they mentioned that on the way to Heathrow fairly recently they had seen a line of pylons by the side of the motorway (so either the M4 or the M25).  Immediately realising that it would be of interest to me they captured the view on their phone and you can see the result above.  I don't have any more information that that, but thank you to the student for ensuring that September is not a pylon free month.

Just to give fans a bit more to look at, I thought that I'd also share a news article about a Stockholm architect's plans to convert two disused pylons into observation towers.

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The pylons are in Norra Djurgården national city park in Stockholm.  According to dezeen magazine

"Both we as an office and the client see an industrial historical value in keeping some of the big towers – they are quite amazing structures,"  Berensson  [the architect] told Dezeen.  "They have a great potential to be used for other things than carrying power lines – it's a tower for free!" he said. "There is also of course economic benefit in not having to pay to tear them down."

Remember this if you hear of any plans to tear down disused pylon in the UK!!


Pylonof the Month - July 2016

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Finally, here is another pylon and if I don't get better at making time to keep updating this blog, I might have to call it Pylon of the (every other) Month.  Anyway, July brings another pylon sent in by a fan of the blog:

I enjoy your blog and thought you might be interested in some Romanian pylon action (from just outside Victoria, Brasov County).  Romania has a diverse pylon population and as you can see from the picture, is home to the red and white square-shouldered pylon - a good looking pylon if ever i saw one...and i saw plenty. 

I imagine that pylon fans everywhere will agree with the "a good looking pylon if I ever saw one....", not least because this is the kind of pylon that you have to go abroad to see. If there are any red and white pylons in the UK, they are few and far between (pictures to me on @pylonofthemonth if you know of one please) and the design is definitely not to be found on these shores.  The email that accompanied this picture goes on:

As you can probably tell from the photo this particular specimen was captured at dusk and is providing perching support for Transylvanian rooks. Four cows and a small number of modernist sheep are gathered at the base of the pylon but vegetation unfortunately blocks our sight of them. I trust you'll appreciate the pylon's stocky eastern european charm.

This is definitely the first Transylvanian pylon to feature on the blog and of course I'm sure I don't need to remind readers of the links to Bram Stoker's Dracula novel which was published in 1897.  If reading this has you looking for flights to Transylvania, then read Lonely Planet's "Ten things you need to know" before heading off on your travels. You might also want to know a bit about what plug adaptors to take so here is the information you need.  

That's all for this month.  Look out for the "What I did on my Holidays" pylon next month. I'm off with the family to Slovenia and Croatia, so I'll be sure to make time for a bit of pylon photography.


Pylon of the Month - February 2016

AndromedaPylon

A long time ago in a galaxy far far away, some photons of light set out on a journey towards earth. They arrived recently and had the luck to be captured by @Skullet who posted a picture on twitter which caught my eye because of the pylon.  The galaxy concerned is Andromeda and you can see it near the top of the picture above the pylon as a smudge of light.  It's 2.5 million light years from earth which means that the photons of light were traveling through space for 2.5 million years (at about 9500 billion kilometres per year, that is definitely far far away). Andromeda is a galaxy in our local group and because it is visible with the naked eye (if you are in a suitably dark place) it has been known about for a long time.   Wikipedia has this to say

The Persian astronomer Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi wrote a line about the chained constellation in his Book of Fixed Stars around 964, describing the Andromeda Galaxy as a "small cloud".  Star charts of that period labeled it as the Little Cloud.[19] The first description of the Andromeda Galaxy based on telescopic observation was given by German astronomer Simon Marius on December 15, 1612.  Charles Messier catalogued Andromeda as object M31 in 1764 and incorrectly credited Marius as the discoverer despite it being visible to the naked eye. In 1785, the astronomer William Herschel noted a faint reddish hue in the core region of M31. He believed M31 to be the nearest of all the "great nebulae" and based on the color and magnitude of the nebula, he incorrectly guessed that it is no more than 2,000 times the distance of Sirius.  In 1850 William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, saw and made the first drawing of Andromeda's spiral structure.

Back down to earth, the pylon itself is near Crianlarich in Scotland.  Pylon fans interested in visiting the area will be delighted to know that there is plenty to do in the local area, especially if hill walking is your thing.  The last time I was there was about 26 years ago when walking the West Highland Way (with a quick diversion up Ben More on the shores of Loch Lomond) but perhaps this is the excuse I need to revisit the area! Pylons are actually quite a contentious issue in parts of Scotland at the moment with Dumfries and Galloway being especially concerned;  http://dumgalagainstpylons.org/.  As is often the case, it mainly comes down to whether or not one thinks that the additional cost of burying and then maintaining underground cables is justified when weighed against the impact of large pylons on the landscape. It is a problem that isn't going to go away because of the drive for more renewable energy. Getting the electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed means transmission lines and pylons are the cheapest way of doing this, at least if you are thinking only in financial terms.  The relative costs of the overground versus the underground option are much debated as this 2012 report shows and it is not a straightforward issue.

So there you go; it was already late February when this pylon was posted. I hope it was worth the wait and that you've learnt something if you've read this far.


Pylon of the Month - December 2015

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November slipped by without a pylon and not wanting pylon fans to end the year on a downer with another blank month, I was looking through the numerous pylon pictures sent in by fans, but struggling to find one that was right for December.  Then on Twitter as @pylonofthemonth, I was alerted to the wonderful picture above of a Cumbrian pylon.  

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Making this Pylon of the Month seemed to be the least I could do given the troubles being caused in Cumbria by the weather, although I guess that having a Cumbrian pylon feature on my blog isn't going to make too much of a difference to life under such difficult circumstances.  The picture was taken by @Gardener_John and you can find more his fantastic pictures here.  Despite growing up in the North West and spending many weeks of my life in the Lake District, I must confess that I had never heard of Levens or Lindale.  Levens has a population of 1007 and the rather magnificent looking Levens Hall with its celebrated topiary garden.  Lindale, on the North-East shore of Morecambe Bay sounds just as interesting because of a famous former resident:

Lindale's most famous resident was John "Iron-Mad" Wilkinson, an ironworker and inventor who lived in the village from 1750, where he owned the Castle Head estate. He produced the iron for and helped design the world's first iron bridge (at Ironbridge and Broseley) and he made the world's first iron boat in 1787. A large iron obelisk stands in the village as memorial to him.

The village's full name of Lindale in Cartmel gives a clue that a road trip to this part of the world is well worth a day or more of your life.  Once you have done a bit of exploring, nearby Cartmel is a foodie destination with Trip Advisor having a guide to the 'The 10 Best Cartmel Restaurants'.  L'Enclume is the most famous and in 2014 was, according to the Good Food Guide, the best restaurant in the UK. So a bit of pylon spotting might be the main aim of your trip, but there are other attractions as well........!  That is what I love about writing Pylon of the Month; I always end up better informed than before I started writing a post.  I hope you are too as well if you have read this far.


Pylon of the Month - October 2015

Pylon of the month

 

The last two months have been up close and personal with my holiday pylons and so for October, I have gone for a more picturesque sunset pylonscape.  I quite like 'pylonscape' as a portmanteau word, although a quick Google search reveals that I'm not the first to use it, with John Sandell photography getting there before me!  The picture was sent in by a fan of the website and was taken in Middlesborough. Avid readers of this blog might remember that this isn't the first pylon from the North East to feature on the blog.  Back in February 2013, the Tees crossing pylons (the tallest pylons in the UK at 145m) featured, but is good to be back on Teeside after a gap of a couple of years.  I've never been to Middlesborough, but if I do, then the Captain Cook birthplace museum will definitely be on my 'things to do' list and the Love Middlesborough website has lots of other museums and galleries that could keep me going for a few days.  That's all for this month, but as always remember to follow @pylonofthemonth on Twitter if you want more regular pylon action.

 


Pylon of the Month - September 2015

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With the start of a new academic year, I have been pressed for time and if a few more days had passed, I might not have got round to posting a pylon for September. Then I was contacted by the BBC and asked to appear on the Mark Forrest show (about the decision to remove some pylons from National Parks - I can't disagree with that) and I thought it would be bad form not to have an up to date blog.  So here is the second of my holiday pylons, this time from the beautiful Alhama de Granada in Spain.  We had a wonderful family holiday there at the end of August and this picture was taken just above the town after a walk along the famous gorge.  Like last month's pylon, it wouldn't win prizes for magnificence or size, but Pylon of the Month is as much about the unprepossessing pylons as it is about the more magnificent examples that have featured over the years.  I'll leave it there for this month and return in October with more non-holiday pylon action. As always, if you want more regular pylon updates, do remember @pylonofthemonth on Twitter.


Pylon of the Month - July 2015

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With my summer holiday (in Turkey) looming and the usual 'holiday pylon' to follow in August, I thought that I would choose a UK pylon for July.  I have quite a backlog of submissions from fans of the website, but this rather splendid one from Essex caught me eye as I trawled back through my collection of emails from the last year or so.  This is what the email I received had to say:

I recently took these photos whilst out on a 10 mile hike near Woodham Ferrers which is near Maldon in Essex.  I thought the pylons were majestic and fascinating, hence looking on the web at other photos and coming across your site.

Woodham Ferrers itself has more than a few points of interest of which my favourite is that it was attacked during the Peasants' Revolt in 1381. This revolt, about which I knew almost nothing (the name Wat Tyler rang a bell, but that was about it.....), seems to have been about a form of Poll Tax and started in Essex and then spread to Kent.  

I recognised the name of Maldon because of the sea salt connection.  It has been harvested since 1882 because Flat tide-washed marshes and low rainfall mean high salinity.  So pylon fans heading to Essex can top up on sea salt and this series of email exchanges on whether there is a discernible difference between sea salt and other forms of salt makes for interesting reading before you make any purchases.  For literature fans, Maldon also features in HG Wells's War of the Worlds and in the Marvel Universe, the twin superheroes Psylocke and Captain Britain were born and raised in Maldon.  Science fans will be equally pleased to know that John Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh, was nor in Maldon and went on to win the Nobel Prize in physics in 1904 for:

...his investigations of the densities of the most important gases and for his discovery of argon in connection with these studies".

Perhaps more relevant to the picture above, the reason for the blue sky in the background is due to Rayleigh scattering.  I'll end on that note and if you have read this far, then I hope that you are as delighted as I am that a pylon picture can lead to so many interesting (if somewhat random) facts about Essex.  I'm always better informed after writing these posts and hope that any readers are as well.